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Our brains seem to have a connection, which makes us know what the other will say just before she says it, dream what the other dreams. Sure, since we spend most of our time together—we do know each other’s habits and thoughts and use of words, and we get the same visual, sensory, and auditory impressions throughout the day that also affect our dreams. Still, our dreams are similar in surprising ways. Let’s say that M meets a tiger in the jungle, and, at the same time, a tiger randomly pops up in Seb’s (dream-) super market, or Seb has a nostalgic dream of her old friends, and the same friends (unknown to M) make a visit in M’s dream, too. Brain waves jump from little spoon to big spoon.

This connection, this occasionally illuminating and occasionally muddling of brain waves, is our only explanation to why both of us could have thought that all our roof insulation would fit in the Jeep, together with us, the dog, and some groceries. For being such brainy girls, something obviously went wrong with our reasoning. It was a lack of reasoning, more likely. Six giant packs of Roxul Stone Wool insulation and twenty 4×8’ foam boards do not fit in a car. Not even close.

Standing outside Lowes with the helpful loaders, it was hard not to blush when they looked at our car, then at the mountain of insulation, and back at our car again. Oh my. It took us three loads, and it took some good pushing to fit the last wool bags, and it was only with the utmost of stubbornness that the four feet wide and eight feet long foam boards squeaked even half way into the car.

It was 9 pm, and cold, dark, and windy when we finally got the last insulation out to the land. Carrying the giant boards on our heads, M sighed good-humoredly: “We’re crazy…” whereupon Seb replied: “Of course. We have to be to build our own house.” There is probably some truth to that.

But we didn’t feel so crazy when we the next day managed to finish insulating the entire roof! One of the many benefits of building a small house is that each aspect is so very manageable, even if it doesn’t quite fit in a car.

We didn’t use the sheep wool for the roof/ceiling, since we wouldn’t have been able to get a very high R-value. We only had 5.5” space to fill (the 2×6 rafters are in actuality only 5.5”), and we needed to keep 1” air space for the baffles to keep the roof vented, which only left 4.5” for insulation. We used two 0.5” foam boards (they didn’t come in 1”), and 3.5” of the stone wool insulation, which gave us a total 22 R-value. Not much, but the best we could do. We chose the stone wool because it’s non-flammable, non-toxic, and mold resistant. (More info at the bottom of this post.)

What better thing to do on Valentine’s Day than to make our house warm and cozy?!

the 4x8' foam boards just about fit in the Jeep

the 4×8′ foam boards just about fit in the Jeep

Three out of six stone wool insulation packages

Three out of six stone wool insulation packages

The 0.5" foam boards

The 0.5″ foam boards

The tools of the day - the bread knife was by far the best for cutting the stone wool

The tools of the day – the bread knife was by far the best for cutting the stone wool

Seb cuts the foam board to size/

Seb cuts the foam board to size

M cuts the wool with the bread knife

M cuts the wool with the bread knife

the baffles help the keep the 1" air space for our vented cathedral ceiling

the baffles help the keep the 1″ air space for our vented cathedral ceiling

Inserting the first out of two foam boards

Inserting the first out of two foam boards

roof insulation (12)roof insulation (13)

Inserting the stone wool

Inserting the stone wool

The loft is done!

The loft is done!

The main room ceiling

The main room ceiling

Ada made her own bow and arrow.

Ada made her own bow and arrow.

ROXUL Stone Wool In formation (from their site): http://www.roxul.com/

“ROXUL insulation is a rock-based mineral fiber insulation comprised of Basalt rock and Recycled Slag. Basalt is a volcanic rock which is abundant in the earth, and slag is a by-product of the steel and copper industry. The minerals are melted and spun into fibers.

ROXUL products are inorganic which provide no food source for mold to grow. ROXUL products are tested to ASTM C1338 – Standard Test for Determining Fungi Resistance – and pass with zero fungal growth.

A fire rating is determined by testing a complete system, such as a wall with all its components, and not the insulation alone. ROXUL products are non-combustible and have an approximate melting temperature of 2150ºF but cannot hold a fire rating by itself, as is the case with any other insulation.  If you require a specific fire rating, please contact ROXUL at 1-800-265-6878.

No, “off-gassing” is a term that was started when blowing agents were utilized in insulation materials and ROXUL does not incorporate blowing agents in their products.  The organic binders that are used in the manufacturing process are introduced to a high temperature curing phase, virtually eliminating volatile components.”

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